Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Is Your Local Bar Figging You When It Comes To Serving An Honest Pint??

Because that would be downright un-American.
Beer prices at bars and restaurants have risen over the past few months, as prices of hops and barley have skyrocketed and retail business has slowed alongside the economy.

Some restaurants have replaced 16-ounce pint glasses with 14 ouncers -- a type of glassware one bartender called a "falsie."

And customers are complaining that bartenders are increasingly putting less than 16 ounces of beer in a pint glass, filling up the extra space with foam.
Goddamn assholes.
Dedicated beer drinkers are fighting back, with extra vigilance about exactly how much beer they get for their buck. They are protesting "cheater pints" and "profit pours" by outing alleged offenders on Web discussion boards and plugging bars that maintain 16-ounce pints, in hopes peer pressure will prevail. And they are spreading the word about how to spot the smaller glass (the bottom is thicker).

Jason Alstrom, who founded the magazine BeerAdvocate last year, calls it the "Less for More" phenomenon. "It's happening everywhere," he says. He is urging readers and users of his Web site, www.beeradvocate.com, to "raise a fist and refuse to pay" when served a skimpy pint.
Is right.

Seriously, we’ve come across plenty of these less-than-pint glasses in our day. (And well before this alleged “recession” or increase in the price of hops and barley, we might add.)

So suffice it to say, we do not appreciate the practice. At all.
Beer activists are talking about developing stickers to adhere to the windows of bars and restaurants where pints live up to the name. Oregon legislator Brian Clem is taking up the issue for the state's 2009 budget, hoping to fund monitoring of beer portions by the state's agriculture department.

In the U.K., the Imperial Pint (equivalent to 19.2 U.S. ounces) has been a government-regulated standard for several centuries. The standard requires use of official pint glasses -- with the word "Pint" and the European "CE" marking -- etched onto each glass. The glasses actually hold more than an Imperial Pint, so there's room for the foam.
Sounds like a good idea to us.

Seriously, you deserve a full pint. Make sure you get it.
Beer drinkers feeling shortchanged can take immediate action: They can ask for a "top-off" after the foam on the profit pour settles. That's what George Collentine did when he was served a beer with almost two inches of foam at an Italian restaurant this month. "I just waited," says the 38-year-old chemical-company manager from Danbury, Conn. The bartender gave it to him.
Brewers, however, do get our sympathy. Here's a video from MarketWatch about the rising cost of hops and barley.


Related:
A Pint-Size Problem - Beer lovers nurse a grudge as some bars switch to smaller glasses [ Wall Street Journal ]
via
Beer Costs Force Barkeeps to Become Budweiser Misers [ Grub Street ]

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